CAN AM SPYDER NOW AVAILABLE IN THE UK

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CAN AM SPYDER ENGINE
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CAN AM SPYDER WIRING
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Spyder Technology

Introducing the BRP Can Am Spyder Roadster, slamming together the stylings of both a high end sports car and the manoeuvrability of a sports bike together for the most breathtaking and astonishing ride you will ever experience, prepare to be blown away by the stunning power of the Spyder!

With its unique Y-architecture body frame, and its unorthodox layout comprising of 2 front wheels and a singular rear wheel, accompanied by the seating position of your typical racing motorbike, you will feel right at home perched upon this marvel of modern technology and frightening power. The Can Am Spyder rides on a steel spine and sports car suspension, making it lightweight, yet tough.

Under the hood you can find the Rotax V990 engine, fed with a smooth five speed gearbox in either a sequential manual or an automatic option, and final belt drive delivering a powerful and astonishingly smooth driving experience.

Accompanying the pure power of this machine is a range of sophisticated safety and stability systems. These allow the Can AmSpyder to detect everything from a slipping wheel to engine performance. These ECU’s are:

  • DPS - Dynamic Power Steering
  • VSS - Vehicle Stability System
  • DESS - Digitally Encoded Security System
  • EFI - Electronic Fuel Injection

And bringing all these together is the Command Centre Interface. This multi function gauge provides an overview of all the integrated critical functions. The user friendly display allows you to choose exactly what information you wish to view. This unit also has a comprehensive diagnostics centre integrated into it, allowing you to troubleshoot any problems yourself from the comfort of the front seat. Information can either be displayed in metric measurements or U.S Standard measurements.

You will also find in the dashboard area a dual analogue LCD display with integrated tachometer, an electric fuel gauge, making sure you never forget to fill up, daily trip meters, a visual representation of the engine temperature, as well as a handy gear position indicator.

The Can Am Spyder comes in two stunning colours, the vibrant millennium Yellow to ensure this machine is a real head turner, or you can go for the full moon finish, whilst not as vibrant as the yellow, still makes a statement with unrelenting style.

There is also a wide range optional extras to choose from, these are:

  • Fog Lights
  • Xenon Lights
  • Mono Seat Cover
  • Racing Exhaust Pipe
  • Travel Bags
  • Cargo Liner
  • Passenger Backrest
  • Low and high windshields.

With all these extras and more, you can customise the Spyder to suit your exact needs, making it a versatile machine as well as a fantastic riding experience.

The Spyder also comes with a 2 year Warranty for ultimate peace of mind.

SM5 Silver £12929.00,
SM5 Yellow £13279.00
SE5 Silver £14229.00
SE5 Yellow £14579.00
SE5 Red £14579.00
on the road.
 

CAN AM SPYDER SPECIFICATIONS

/ Engine /
Manufacturer................................BRP-Rotax
Type..............................................990 V-Twin
Displacement...............................60.90 in3 (998cc)
Bore..............................................3.82 in (97 mm)
Stroke...........................................2.68 in (68 mm)
Cylinder........................................2
Valves per cylinder.......................DOHC 4
Max output...................................106 hp @ 8500 rpm
(79 kW @ 8500 rpm)
Max torque...................................77 lb-ft @ 6250 rpm
(104.3 Nm @ 6250 rpm)
Compression ratio........................10.8:1
Ignition type.................................Electronic ignition with
dual output coil
Lubrication....................................5W40 BRP synthetic oil
Exhaust system.............................2-into-1 with catalytic converter
Cooling.........................................Liquid cooled
Injection........................................Multi-point EFI with 57 mm
diameter throttle bodies

/ Drive Train /
Gear box......................................Sequential Manual 5-Speed (SM5)
with transmission-based reverse
Optional gear box........................Sequential Electronic 5-Speed (SE5)
with transmission-based reverse
Final drive.....................................28/79 ratio final drive with
Carbon-reinforced drive belt
Clutch...........................................Wet, multi-plate, manual or electronic
operation through a hydraulic piston

/ Electric Equipment /
Magneto.......................................500 Watt
Starter...........................................Electric
Battery..........................................Dry Cell, 12V, 21 Amp

/ Geometry /
Front suspension..........................Double A-Arm with anti-roll bar
Front suspension travel................5.67 in (144 mm) with adjustable cam
Rear suspension...........................Swing-arm with monoshock
Rear suspension travel.................5.71 in (145 mm) with adjustable cam
Chassis type.................................SST Spyder
(Surrounding Spar Technology)
Steering........................................DPS (Dynamic Power Steering)

/ Tires & Wheels /
Front tire.......................................KR21 165/65R14
Front nominal pressure................13-17 psi (89-117 kPa)
Rear tire........................................KR21 225/50R15
Rear nominal pressure..................26-30 psi (179-207 kPa)
Wheel size, front...........................Aluminum 14x5 (355x127)
Wheel size, rear............................Aluminum 15x7 (381x178)

 

 

 

 

 

 

/ Brakes /
Type..........................................Foot-actuated, fully integrated
hydraulic 3-wheel braking system
Front braking system................4 piston calipers with 10.2 in x 0.25 in
(260 mm x 6 mm) discs
Rear braking system.................Single-piston caliper with 10.2 in x 0.25 in
(260 mm x 6 mm) disc
EBD..........................................Electronic Brake Distribution
ABS...........................................Anti-lock Braking System
Parking brake...........................Mechanical, foot actuated to the
rear caliper

/ Safety & Security /
VSS...........................................Vehicle Stability System
ABS...........................................Anti-lock Braking System
TCS...........................................Traction Control System
SCS...........................................Stability Control System with
Roll-Over Mitigation
DPS...........................................Dynamic Power Steering
DESS.........................................Digitally Encoded Security System

/ Vehicle Dimensions & Weights /
Dry vehicle weight....................697 lbs (316 kg)
Front storage capacity.............2,685 in3 (44 l)
Front max load capacity...........30 lbs (15.9 kg)
Total vehicle load allowed........440 lbs (200 kg)
Fuel capacity............................6.6 US gal (25 l)
Oil capacity..............................1.19 US gal (4.5 l)
Coolant capacity......................0.85 US gal (3.2 l)
GVWR.......................................1,188 lbs (540 kg)
Ground clearance.....................4.5 in (115 mm)
Vehicle overall height...............45.1 in (1,145 mm)
Vehicle overall length...............105 in (2,667 mm)
Vehicle overall width................59.3 in (1,506 mm)
Seat (top) height.......................29 in (737 mm)
Wheel base..............................68 in (1,727 mm)
Wheel track, front.....................51.5 in (1,308 mm)
Type of gas...............................Unleaded, 87 octane minimum

/ Features & Main Options /
Color choices...........................Full Moon
Millennium Yellow
Roadster Red
Instrumentation........................Dual analog and LCD w/speedometer,
tachometer, electric fuel gauge,
daily trip (A & B) meters, engine
temperature, ambient temperature
and gear position indicator. Information
displayed in either metric or US Standards
Main options............................Fog lights, xenon lights,
mono seat cover, racing exhaust pipe,
travel bags, cargo liner, passenger
backrest, low and high windshields
Warranty...................................2 years

 

CAN AM SPYDER

THE ALL NEW BRP CAN AM SPYDER A COMPLETELY NEW FORM OF PERSONEL TRANSPORT THE CAN AM SPYDER IS BRP 'S LATEST PRODUCT IN THE LEISURE MARKET.

CAN AM SPYDERS AVAILABLE SHORTLY IN THE UK

ALONG WITH A FULL RANGE OF CAN AM SPYDER PARTS AND CAN AM ACCESSORIES

 

 

 

CAN AM HISTORY

Can-Am started out as a race series for Group 7 sports racers with two races in Canada (Can) and four races in the US (Am). The series was initially sponsored by J-Wax. The Series used the FIA Group 7 category with unrestricted engine capacity.

The Group 7 category was essentially a formula libre for sports cars; the regulations were minimal and permitted unlimited engine sizes (and allowed turbocharging and supercharging), virtually unrestricted aerodynamics, and were as close as any major international racing series ever got to anything goes. As long as the car had two seats and bodywork enclosing the wheels, and met basic safety standards, it was legal... Group 7 had arisen as a category for non-homologated sports car 'specials' in Europe and for a while in the 1960s Group 7 racing was popular in the United Kingdom as well as a class in hillclimb racing in Europe. Group 7 cars were designed more for short-distance sprints than for endurance racing. Some Group 7 cars were also built in Japan by Nissan and Toyota, but these did not compete outside their homeland (though some of the Can-Am competitors went over to race against them occasionally).

SCCA sports car racing was becoming more popular with European constructors and drivers, and the US Road Racing Championship for large-capacity sports racers eventually gave rise to the Group 7 Can-Am series. There was good prize and appearance money and plenty of trade backing; the series was lucrative for its competitors but resulted, by its end, in truly outrageous cars with well over 1000 horsepower (750 kW) (some teams claimed 1500 HP in qualifying trim), wings, active downforce generation, very light weight and unheard of speeds. Similar Group 7 cars ran in the European Interserie series, but this was much lower-key than the Can-Am.

A second generation of Can-Am followed, but this was a fundamentally different series based initially on converted Formula 5000 cars with closed-wheel bodies. There was also a 2L class based in Formula 2 chassis.

The Can-Am is mostly remembered as the last series to allow unlimited motor racing before it became definitely over in 1974.


McLaren cars were specially designed race cars. The Can-Am cars were developments of the sports cars which were introduced in 1964 for the North American sports car races. The development variants M1A and M1B were raced as factory cars in the 1966 with Bruce McLaren and Chris Amon as drivers. In 1967, specifically for the Can-Am series, the McLaren team introduced a new model, the M6. The McLaren M6 also introduced what was to become the trademark orange colour for the team. The McLaren team consisted of team owner and leader Bruce McLaren and Denny Hulme. The M6 series were a full aluminum monocoque design with no uncommon features but, for the time, uncommon attention to detail. The M6 series of cars were powered by smallblock Chevy engines built by George Boltoff for McLaren and were the model of reliability. This was followed in 1968 by the M8A, a new design based around the Chevy Mark IV "big block" engine as a stressed member of the chassis. The M8B, M8C, M8D and M20C were developments of that aluminum monocoque chassis. McLaren so dominated the 1968-1971 seasons that Can-Am was often called the "Bruce and Denny Show" after the drivers. Sadly, Bruce McLaren lost his life on June 2, 1970 at Goodwood when the rear bodywork of his prototype M8D detached during testing resulting in a totally uncontrollable car and a fatal highspeed crash. Team McLaren went on to become a several time F1 champion and is still very much a part of F1.

Jim Hall's Chaparrals were very innovative, following his success in the United States Road Racing Championship (USRRC). Jim Hall's 2 series Chaparrals (built and engineered with a high degree of covert support from Chevrolet's research and development division) were leaders in the application of aerodynamics to racecars culminating with the introduction of the 2E in 1966, the first of the high wing race cars. The 2E was a defining design, and the 2G was a development of that basic design. The FIA banned movable aerodynamic devices and Chaparral responded with the 2H 1969. The 2H broke new ground, seeking to reduce drag but didn't achieve much success. The 2J that followed was perhaps the ultimate example of what Group 7 rules could allow in a racing car. It was a twin-engined car, with the by-then usual big-block Chevrolet engine providing the driving force, and a tiny snowmobile engine powering a pair of fans at the back of the car. These fans, combined with the moveable Lexan 'skirts' around the bottom of the car created a vacuum underneath the car, effectively providing the same level of downforce as the huge wings of previous vehicles, without the drag. Although far too mechanically complex to survive in racing environments, the theory was sound, and would appear in Formula One a few years later, first in Colin Chapman's Lotus cars, and even more directly in the BT46B 'Fan Car' of 1978.

The Lola T-70, T-160, T-163, and T-260 were built for various customers and were generally either Chevy or Ford powered. The Lola T-70 driven by John Surtees won the first Can Am championship.

Don Nichols' UoP-sponsored Shadow team made its debut with an astonishing car with tiny wheels and radiators mounted on top of the rear wing; this was unsuccessful, but later more conventional cars came to dominate the final Can-Am series as Porsche and McLaren faded from the scene.

The Porsche 908 spyder was used in Can Am, but was underpowered (350 hp) and mainly used by underfunded teams. It did win the 1970 Road Atlanta race though when the more powerful cars fell out. The 917PA, a spyder version of the 917K Le Mans car, was raced, but its normally aspirated flat-12 was underpowered (530hp). In 1971 the 917/10 was introduced. This was still not turbocharged, but was lighter and had cleaner body work, and Jo Siffert managed to finish fourth in the championship.

 
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ABOUT US

The open-air experience of a motorcycle can be terrifically fun, but there’s an obvious problem: motorcycles fall over, resulting in definite injury to the ego and possibly to the body. BRP, the company that makes Ski-Doo snowmobiles, Can-Am ATVs, and Sea Doo watercraft, thinks it has a solution: a three-wheeler called the Can-Am Spyder.
Three-wheelers are not new. The British company Morgan got its start almost 100 years ago with a trike that drivers sat in and drove more or less like a car. The Can Am Spyder pilot, however, straddles a motorcycle-like seat and turns the two front wheels with handlebars. By the way, the Department of Transportation considers the Spyder a motorcycle, and in all states except California, Delaware, and North Carolina, you’ll need a cycle license to ride it. In those other three, a car license will do.
The idea here is to bring the motorcycle experience to a vehicle that’s much easier to operate. Motorcycles can be tricky to learn, as the control layout is different, and you have to shift your weight and lean into corners. Sure, plenty of folks figure it out—about 700,000 street bikes are sold every year—but the learning curve can be a barrier to entry.
The Can Am Spyder has several features that make it easy to ride. Whereas motorcycles typically have a hand lever for the front brake and a foot pedal for the rear, the Spyder’s brakes are linked and actuated only by a right-foot pedal. And, very unusual for bikes, these are standard anti-lock brakes, and the Spyder also has a traction- and stability-control systems. Steering effort is light, thanks to electric assist, a vacuum booster lightens the clutch pull, and a reverse gear aids parking. If this sounds like “Motorcycling for Dummies,” you’re right. Although hard-core knee draggers may deride the Spyder as a cycle with training wheels, it’s not really meant for them. It is, however, undeniably fun to ride.

We didn’t get a chance to do an instrumented test, but from our brief ride, it was obvious that the Can Am Spyder has plenty of poke. A water-cooled 1.0-liter V-2 pumps out 106 horsepower, which the company claims should be enough to propel the roughly 750-pound trike to 60 mph in 4.5 seconds. Frankly, it felt quicker than that, with instant response available anywhere in its 9500-rpm range.
What struck us most, however, was how quickly we were piloting the Can Am Spyder with confidence. After the first few minutes of riding, we had already buried the throttle and turned hard enough to engage the nondefeatable stability-control system. Most of us wouldn’t attempt riding a two-wheeler that aggressively. Another useful thing is that it helps you lean into turns. That’s a good thing because, unlike in a car, the rider’s body position has a noticeable effect on the vehicle’s response and, in addition, leaning alleviates the uncomfortable sensation that a hard turn might eject the rider. We found that, despite the power steering, it takes a healthy push on the handlebar to turn the wheels. The suspension—aided by tires that are inflated to only 14 psi—easily soaked up bumps and potholes, however, and the brakes arrested forward momentum with striking authority.

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